Certificate in Religion and Conflict

It's a complicated world. Prepare yourself.

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Religion has played a crucial role in various forms of human conflict, historically and in our own times. The nature of that role, however, varies significantly, as religion provides contexts for division and war as well as for unity and peace.

ASU’s Undergraduate Certificate in Religion and Conflict provides students a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the dynamics of religion, conflict and peace by exploring questions such as these:

  • What are the religious and non-religious causes of conflict or factors that contribute to it?
  • What do we mean by the term “religious violence”?
  • What secular and religious resources exist for resolving different kinds of conflict?
  • What do we mean by “peace”?
  • How can religion inform the pursuit of peace?

Q: Why should I consider a certificate in Religion and Conflict?

A: An enhanced understanding of religion and conflict is proving to be increasingly vital. Religion has played a crucial role in various forms of human conflict, historically and in our current times. The certificate may be of particular interest for students pursuing careers in journalism, law, policy work, diplomacy, the military, public advocacy, publishing, education, ministry, or other fields in which an enhanced understanding ...

Q: What can I expect to get out of the program?

A: The certificate program provides students a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the dynamics of religion, conflict, and peace by exploring questions such as:

  • What are the religious and non-religious causes of conflict?
  • What do we mean by "religious violence"?
  • What do secular and religious resources exist for resolving conflict?
  • What do we mean by "peace"?

Q: Who is the certificate open to?

A: The certificate is open to any undergraduate student enrolled at Arizona State University in any degree or non-degree program. 

Foreign exchange students attending ASU while enrolled through their home institutions are not eligible to receive the certificate, though during their residence they may sign up for classes that are part of the certificate program. A minimum grade of “C” is required for a course to fulfill a certificate requirement.

Q: Is the certificate available to online students?

A: The religion and conflict certificate is not designed as an online certificate program.  However, while we cannot guarantee that the courses will be offered as part of the online program, it is possible to complete the requirements and earn the certificate if you can find the courses to make it work. If you have any questions about specific courses please email us (matt.correa@asu.edu).

Q: What if I still have questions? Who can I get in touch with?

A: Matt Correa is the Center's Assistant Research Administrator and the guy in charge of our student programs. He's available via phone or email to answer your questions!

The certificate is open to all students and majors. It may be of particular interest to students pursuing careers in journalism, law, policy work, diplomacy, the military, public advocacy, publishing, education, ministry or other fields in which an enhanced understanding of religion and conflict is increasingly vital.

Students must complete 18 credit hours of qualifying course work (at least 12 hours from ASU), consisting of regional, political, and cultural components. A minimum grade of “C” is required for a course to fulfill a certificate requirement. In many cases, the same course can be used to fulfill several requirements simultaneously. 

1. Regional component (6 hours, 2 different regions)
Courses in this category provide students regional knowledge of how religion has been implicated in human conflict. Required coursework in at least two different regions fosters a comparative understanding of the dynamics of religion and conflict in historical and global contexts.

2. Political component (3 hours)
Courses in this category explore how religion influences—or is influenced by—matters of state, law, government, or other dimensions of political life.

3. Cultural component (3 hours)
Courses in this category provide students with an understanding of how religion operates as a powerful force that impacts and intersects with expressions of human identity, thought, art, history, science and culture.

4. Electives (6 hours)
Any approved/qualifying course may be used as an elective to fulfill remaining requirements.

Interdisciplinary requirement
To ensure that students are exposed to a wide variety of approaches, an interdisciplinary component requires that at least 6 of the 18 hours be filled with courses from the Humanities (ARB, HST, POR or REL) and at least 3 hours from the Social Sciences (SOC, POS, SGS or WST).

In addition to the list of regularized courses, there are many special topic courses (generally numbered 194, 294, 394, 494, and 498) that can fulfill certificate requirements as approved by the certificate director.

Here are the steps and documents necessary for enrolling in the religion and conflict certificate program:

Complete both of these forms and email them to Matt.Correa@asu.edu

1) Microsoft Office document iconStudent Enrollment Form

2) Request to Add an Undergraduate Certificate Form 
Some of the fields on this form have been filled in for you. You only need to enter in your name, ID #, phone number, and add your signature in the "student signature" box. This form requires your signature--you must sign it, scan it, and email the signed copy, but you do not need to worry about the other signatures on the form.  

NOTE: If you are not majoring in History, Philosophy, or Religious Studies (the SHPRS' majors), you should also meet with your academic advisor to let him or her know that you intend to add the certificate.

Progress and Completion

  • Check your Degree Audit Report (DAR) regularly to confirm that your courses are being properly applied.  Once you have completed all certificate requirements, or to check on your progress, email the Microsoft Office document iconStudent Worksheet to Matt.Correa@asu.edu

SPRING 2019

REGIONAL COMPONENT
 (remember, to complete the certificate you must have at least 1 course from 2 different regions)

Religion and Europe
HST 304 Rebirth of European Jewish Life after 1950 (also offered as JST 304)
HST 360 The Crusades*
JST 445 Holocaust & German Memory (also offered as SLC 445/GER 445/HON 494)
REL 374 Witchcraft & Heresy in Europe

Religion and the Middle East 
ARB 335 Arabic Culture and Islam
ARB 341 Quran Text and Women
ARB 394 Iraqi Culture & Society
ARB 394 Islamic Philosophy
HST 372 Modern Middle East*
REL 366 Islam in the Modern World

Religion and the United States
HST 211 Jews and Judaism in America* (also offered as JST 211/REL 211) 
REL 320 American Religious Traditions
REL 321 Religion in America
REL 323 African American Religion

Religion and Africa
REL 461  Different Voices within Contemporary Islamic Discourse* (also offered as AFR 480, SGS 442)
POS 359  African Politics and Society*

Religion and Asia 
HST 303 Modern China: Violence*
HST 384 Modern China: 1700 to Present*
HST 391 Modern Southeast Asia* (also offered as SGS 381)
HST 452 Chinese Cultural History II*

POLITICAL COMPONENT
CEL 100 Great Ideas of Politics and Ethics in Comparative Perspective
CEL 494 Political Leadership and Statesmanship
COM 312 Communication/Conflict & Negotiation
HST 304 Totalitarianism: Hitler & Stalin* (also offered as JST 304)
HST 372 Modern Middle East*
HST 391 Modern Southeast Asia (also offered as SGS 381)
HST 454 History of Genocide (also offered as FOR 454)
JUS 374 Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights* 
REL 494 Sacred Crimes: Religion, Violence and Criminality
POS 359 African Politics and Society*
POS 364 National Security/ Intl Terrorism* 
POS 368 Ethics and Human Rights 
POS 394 The Future of War

CULTURAL COMPONENT  
ARB 335 Arabic Culture and Islam
ARB 341 Quran Text and Women
ARB 394 Islamic Philosophy
ARB 394 Iraqi Culture & Society
HST 302 Women, War, and Peace*
HST 302 Envisioning Peace*
HST 302 Jews and Christians & Muslims in Early Modern World*
HST 304 History of Antisemitism* (also offered as JST 304)
HST 304 Rebirth of European Jewish Life after 1950* (also offered as JST 304)
HST 452 Chinese Cultural History II*
IAS 406 Moral Dilemmas (also offered as PHI 406)
IAS 430 Science and Religion
PHI 318 Philosophy of Religion
REL 201 Religion and the Modern World 
REL 202 Religion and Popular Culture
REL 315 Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) (also offered as JST 315)
REL 320 American Religious Tradition
REL 321 Religion in America 
REL 371 New Testament
REL 374 Witchcraft & Heresy in Europe
REL 381 Religion and Moral Issues
REL 390 Women, Gender and Religion (also offered as WSt 390)
REL 394 Religion, Science and Citizenship
REL 394 Global Citizenship: Critical Perspective (also offered as SGS 394)
REL 405 Problems in Religious Studies
REL 411 Judaism/Beginnings Christianity
REL 461 Different Voices within Contemporary Islamic Discourse* (also offered as AFR 480, SGS 442)
REL 494 Issues in Death & Dying (also offered as MAS 550/PHI 494)
SGS 394 Gender and Armed Conflict (also offered as POS 394)
SOC 353 Death & Dying in Cross Cultural Perspectives*
SOC 420 Sociology of Religion*

Note: any approved course can be used for 1 of the 2 electives for the certificate


COURSE LISTS BY SEMESTER
PDF iconSpring 2019
PDF iconFall 2018