Certificate in Religion and Conflict

It's a complicated world. Prepare yourself.

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Religion has played a crucial role in various forms of human conflict, historically and in our own times. The nature of that role, however, varies significantly, as religion provides contexts for division and war as well as for unity and peace.

ASU’s Undergraduate Certificate in Religion and Conflict provides students a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the dynamics of religion, conflict and peace by exploring questions such as these:

  • What are the religious and non-religious causes of conflict or factors that contribute to it?
  • What do we mean by the term “religious violence”?
  • What secular and religious resources exist for resolving different kinds of conflict?
  • What do we mean by “peace”?
  • How can religion inform the pursuit of peace?

Q: Why should I consider a certificate in Religion and Conflict?

A: An enhanced understanding of religion and conflict is proving to be increasingly vital. Religious has played a crucial role in various forms of human conflict, historically and in our current times. The certificate may be of particular interest for students pursuing careers in journalism, law, policy work, diplomacy, the military, public advocacy, publishing, education, ministry, or other fields in which an enhanced understanding ...

Q: What can I expect to get out of the program?

A: The certificate program provides students a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the dynamics of religion, conflict, and peace by exploring questions such as:

  • What are the religious and non-religious causes of conflict?
  • What do we mean by "religious violence"?
  • What do secular and religious resources exist for resolving conflict?
  • What do we mean by "peace"?

Q: Who is the certificate open to?

A: The certificate is open to any undergraduate student enrolled at Arizona State University in any degree or non-degree program. 

Foreign exchange students attending ASU while enrolled through their home institutions are not eligible to receive the certificate, though during their residence they may sign up for classes that are part of the certificate program. A minimum grade of “C” is required for a course to fulfill a certificate requirement.

Q: Is the certificate available to online students?

A: The religion and conflict certificate is not designed as an online certificate program.  However, while we cannot guarantee that the courses will be offered as part of the online program, it is possible to complete the requirements and earn the certificate if you can find the courses to make it work. If you have any questions about specific courses please email us (matt.correa@asu.edu).

Q: What if I still have questions? Who can I get in touch with?

A: Matt Correa is the Center's Assistant Research Administrator and the guy in charge of our student programs. He's available via phone or email to answer your questions!

The certificate is open to all students and majors. It may be of particular interest to students pursuing careers in journalism, law, policy work, diplomacy, the military, public advocacy, publishing, education, ministry or other fields in which an enhanced understanding of religion and conflict is increasingly vital.

Students must complete 18 credit hours of qualifying course work (at least 12 hours from ASU), consisting of regional, political, and cultural components. A minimum grade of “C” is required for a course to fulfill a certificate requirement. In many cases, the same course can be used to fulfill several requirements simultaneously. 

1. Regional component (6 hours, 2 different regions)
Courses in this category provide students regional knowledge of how religion has been implicated in human conflict. Required coursework in at least two different regions fosters a comparative understanding of the dynamics of religion and conflict in historical and global contexts.

2. Political component (3 hours)
Courses in this category explore how religion influences—or is influenced by—matters of state, law, government, or other dimensions of political life.

3. Cultural component (3 hours)
Courses in this category provide students with an understanding of how religion operates as a powerful force that impacts and intersects with expressions of human identity, thought, art, history, science and culture.

4. Electives (6 hours)
Any approved/qualifying course may be used as an elective to fulfill remaining requirements.

Interdisciplinary requirement
To ensure that students are exposed to a wide variety of approaches, an interdisciplinary component requires that at least 6 of the 18 hours be filled with courses from the Humanities (ARB, HST, POR or REL) and at least 3 hours from the Social Sciences (SOC, POS, SGS or WST).

In addition to the list of regularized courses, there are many special topic courses (generally numbered 194, 294, 394, 494, and 498) that can fulfill certificate requirements as approved by the certificate director.